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Category Archives: Project Management

Admitting that you have a problem

It’s not always easy to recognize when your project is in trouble. Yes, if your project crashes and burns and completely fails to deliver, it’s failed. But sometimes you don’t realize that you’ve  or you’ve built the wrong software and are about to make your users very unhappy. The first step in fixing your project problems is admitting that you have a problem.

Demoralize Your Teams Quickly And Efficiently With Micromanagement

Apparently I’ve earned the dubious distinction of having become an expert in project failure. I’ve always had an interest in project failure—Jenny and I have been doing our “Why Projects Fail” talk for years now, and we’ve talked to many people in many different industries (like in our fourth book, Beautiful Teams) about what’s gone […]

A Few Things Every Job-Seeking Programmer Should Know About Project Management (part 2)

I’ve met a lot of programmers who really hate project management. And it’s not that surprising, because project management done poorly can be a pain. But if you’re a developer looking for a job, employers are more and more likely to expect you to know something about project management. Luckily, good project management can make […]

A Few Things Every Job-Seeking Programmer Should Know About Project Management (part 1)

I’ve met a lot of programmers who really hate project management. And it’s not that surprising, because project management done poorly can be unnecessarily restrictive. But if you’re a developer looking for a job, employers are more and more likely to expect you to know something about project management. Luckily, good project management can make your life easier, and it’s worth knowing about it – not just for job interviews, but to help you get the most out of your own projects. Here are a few basic things that I think every developer ought to know about project management, and why I think you should care about them.

Our obsessive project tracking problem

As a group, we developers have a project tracking problem: the problem is that we constantly, almost obsessively want to track our projects, and it’s made worse by the fact that it’s so easy to abuse otherwise great tools like JIRA and Bugzilla. Unfortunately, while tracking projects may feel useful and productive, for most teams it’s just busywork – and it can lead to a self-imposed exercise in needless bureaucracy that just wastes our time. But with a few ground rules, you can escape the project tracking trap and use a tracking tool effectively.